Tentative
GENERAL CHEMISTRY
GENERAL POLICY

Dr. Bryan

SC225E

591-8006


     Go to Chem 1364 Syllabus



 

 

Course:                     General Chemistry I           CHEM 1364

                                    MWF   12:40 - 1:50 a.m.     Sect. 1048

                                    Text: Chemistry 10rd Edition by Brown/LeMay/Bursten of Prentice-Hall

Instructor:                Dr. Clinton D. Bryan

                                    SC 225E                                            581-2246 (Office)

                                    clintb@cameron.edu                     591-8011 (FAX)

 

Teaching Philosophy: The purpose of higher education is to facilitate the transformation of the student into a problem-solver.  The scientific method affords the best model.  Although the instructor intends to cover as much material during class sessions as possible, this course should assist the student develop research skills for acquiring information by encouraging reading beyond the text and lecture notes.  Making predictions based upon available information is a key component in solving a problem; therefore, the instructor poses questions to stimulate student involvement in problem-solving in the classroom.  It is unlikely that a single perspective of the problem is taken by the students; so several media will be utilized for covering the material.  These include but are not limited to chalk-talk, overhead projection, PowerPoint, web sites, laboratory, library, video, demonstrations, and classroom hands-on activities.  Also, the students in the course represent numerous majors; therefore, examinations normally include a variety of question types such as selective response, short answer, essay, drawing, and diagramming in order to prepare them more broadly for problem-solving.  The student must be the active learner, for the instructor has only enough class time to outline the course as a facilitator.    

 

TENTATIVE ASSESSMENT & GRADING SCHEME: 

Instrument                                          #        Possible Contribution       Overall %        Final Grade

Examination                                       4                100 each                          90.0  - 100.0              A

Final Examination                             1                 100 each                           80.0  -   89.9              B

Quiz                                                    many          100 total                           70.0  -   79.9              C

Assignment                                       many          100 total                            60.0  -   69.9              D

                                                                                                                        <  59.9                         F

Because the number of quizzes and the number of assignments is not defined, the average performances determined for each of these two types of assessment instruments will be normalized to a possible maximum of 100 points for each category.  The instructor reserves the right to “curve” the final grades.

 

Academic Dishonesty: Cheating in any form is cause for an automatic ‘F’ for the semester.  Taking the answer from a paper belonging to someone else, and claiming it as your own is wrong, is bad, and is cheating; it certainly is not a rung on the ladder to success.

 

Attendance: The class policy center on personal honesty, on academic integrity, on the ability to think and make application of studied material, on striving to articulate your thoughts verbally, on student responsibility, on utilizing appropriate study skills, and on expecting excellence of yourself.  Detailed attendance records will not be kept.  You are responsible for material covered in class and on all assignments.  Quizzes cannot be made up at all.

 

 

Bonus Point Opportunity: The American Chemical Society, The American Chemical Society Student Affiliate, and the Department of Physical Science at Cameron University sponsor seminars featuring guest lecturers.  One point may be earned for each seminar sponsored by one of these three organizations that is attended.

Also, a pretest created by the American Chemical Society’s Examination Institute will be administered at regularly scheduled CHEM1361 laboratory sessions during the first week of the semester.  Bonus points will be given based upon the number of questions answered correctly.  The instructor reserves the right to subtract fourteen (14) bonus points if there is an obvious pattern of answer choices that indicates a lack of student effort to answer correctly (for example, marking all answers as C).

 

Examinations: The instructor reserves the right to utilize ‘selective response’ such as multiple choice or matching, short answer, or essay questions.  Currently, the plan is to employ multiple choice questions on the planned in-class hour examinations. 

 

Final Examination: Comprehensive examination created by the American Chemical Society’s Examination Institute will be employed at the time indicated in the official CU Enrollment Schedule for the final which is May 6 in the 3pm-5pm period.

How will the standardized exam be figured into my course grade?

Your score will be based on national percentile ranking. A score at the 50th percentile is, by definition, average. Therefore the percentile score must be scaled to reflect grading on a 100-point scale and be consistent with the grade cutoffs listed in the course syllabus.

The class average in chemistry should be 75/100. Therefore, a student scoring at the 50th percentile on the ACS exam should receive a grade of approximately 75%. This scaling will be accomplished by the use of the following formula:

Scaled Score = ACS percentile + [ (100-ACS percentile) (ACS percentile/100) ]

Using the example given above of a student at the 50th percentile on the final, we get:

50 + [ (100 - 50) (50/100) ] = 75


Let's consider some other examples so you can see how this works. The following ACS percentile conversions were calculated using the formula given above:

90 percentile => 99 points, 80 percentile => 96 points, 70 percentile => 91 points,
60 percentile => 84 points, 50 percentile => 75 points, 40 percentile => 64 points,
30 percentile => 51 points, 20 percentile => 36 points, 10 percentile => 19 points.

 

Late Policy:  Homework, assignments, and quizzes will NOT be accepted after the announced due date.  Homework cannot be accepted after corrected, graded assignments have been returned to the class.

 

Make-Up:  There will be no make-up tests or quizzes.  If you will be unable to take an exam on scheduled date, the final examination will be statistically manipulated to compensate.  A score of “zero” will result for an absence to the final examination.

 

 

Office Hours:  My office hours are posted on my office door, on my name plate beside my office door, and in the departmental office.  The departmental secretary (581-2246) will be informed of frequent workshops and responsibilities that prevent me from my office.  Therefore, you might call an appointment before making a special trip to the Lawton campus.  VoiceMail and email are also checked often for student correspondence.  Special announcements concerning exam reviews, tutorials, and help sessions will be announced as necessary.

 

Quiz:  The instructor reserves the right to utilize three styles of quizzes.   Some quizzes may be online through the Companion Website for the adopted textbook.  Some quizzes will be announced in an effort to encourage students to invest additional study into a particular topic.  Some quizzes will be unannounced (i.e., pop quizzes) in an effort to encourage daily study.

 

Assignment:  See note on next page.

 

Withdrawal Policy:  If course withdrawal is an option, please follow the University policies.  The policies and scheduled dates are published in the Cameron University Enrollment Schedule.  An “I” is only given if an emergency/no option situation is documented to have occurred after the final date to withdraw and the student has a satisfactory grade at the time.  The instructor cannot initiate the withdrawal process.                    


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PROGRAM OBJECTIVES 

1.  The initial preparation of the chemistry major to directly enter the chemical industry.

2.  The initial preparation of the chemistry major to enter graduate programs in chemistry and related sciences.
3.  The initial preparation of the student for entry into graduate professional programs such as M.D., D.D.S., D.V.M., and D.O.
4.  Discipline support for other degree programs such as agriculture, biology, and technology.
5.  A source of general education in the physical sciences.  This course should contribute to the
a.  ability to place public issues in a scientific context.
b.  opportunity to understand the scientific process.
c.  recognition of the importance of experimentation used to probe nature.
d. experience of using mathematics to describe nature.
e.  exposure to basic universal laws which describe our physical environment.
f.  opportunity to develop application of scientific concepts.
g.  appreciation for discovery and advances in scientific/technical disciplines.

COURSE OBJECTIVES
1.  Developing fundamental chemical concepts.
2.  Strengthening skills and techniques utilized in chemical applications.
3.  Making connections with other disciplines.
4.  Using chemical technology.
5.  Evaluating societal issues dealing with chemical concepts, applications, or technology.
6. Enhancing science literacy.
7.  Developing the philosophy of science as inquiry and as societal problem-solving.

PERFORMANCE OBJECTIVES
Developing fundamental chemical concepts: 
1.  Understand atomic structures.
Includes describing the structure of the atom by analysis of elemental line
spectra.
2.  Develop a conceptual picture of the Periodic Table of the Elements.
Includes:
a.  classification of the elements by their characteristics.
b.  explaining/defining the subdivisions in groups of two, six, eight, ten, etc.
c.  developing generalizations that can be applied to predicting behavior.
3.  Discuss/explain bonding theories.
Includes:
a.  predicting the types of bonds present in compounds.
b.  predicting the form of compounds in solution based upon types of bonds
present.
4.  Predict and quantify the relationship of pressure, volume, mass, and temperature of gases.
Includes characterization of a gas by application of this relationship.
5.  Discuss/explain/identify patterns of chemical reactivity.
Includes:
a.  analysis and describing of metathesis reactions.
b.  utilizing an understanding of acid-base reactions to analyze samples by
titration.
c.  utilizing an understanding of combination/decomposition reactions to analyze
samples for empirical formulae.
d.  utilizing an understanding of precipitation reactions to analyze samples by
gravimetric methods.
Strengthening skills and techniques utilized in chemical applications:
1.  Work with metric system using scientific measurements.
Includes:
a.  determining the number of significant figures in a measured quantity.
b.  record a numerical result expressing the correct number of significant figures.
c.  use unit-factor (or dimensional) analysis for chemical problem solving.
d.  perform calculations dealing with units derived from length, mass, and
quantity.
e.  perform calculations dealing with contrived units such as density and
concentration.
f.  convert between temperature scales.
2.  Calculate stoichiometric values involving solids, liquids, gases, or solutions.
Includes:
a.  calculating masses.
b.  calculating volumes.
c.  calculating quantities in moles.
d.  calculating concentrations.
e.  calculating/using contrived units such as molar mass and molecular weights.
3.  Interconvert and apply concentration units.
4.  Apply separation methods to analytical problems both qualitatively and quantitatively.
5.  Manipulate and interpret laboratory data numerically and graphically.
6.  Interpret and predict molecular and atomic behavior as measured by spectrometers both qualitatively and quantitatively.
7.  Predict electronic structure based upon elemental position in the Periodic Table.
8.  Predict physical and chemical properties of elements based upon position in the Periodic Table.
9.  Predict structure, geometry, polarization, and hybridization based upon bonding theories and molecular modeling methods such as energy minimization.
Making connections with other disciplines:
1.  Predicting physical properties of matter based upon the concept of intermolecular forces.
Includes:
a.  investigation/discussion of applications at home.
b.  investigation/discussion of applications in the community.
c.  investigation/discussion of applications in other disciplines.
2.  Integrating the scientific literature with the knowledge base and learned skills already possessed by the student.
3.  Integrating the scientific method into the students’ “way of knowing.”
Includes:
a.  collection of data or information.
b.  organization of data or information.
c.  classification of data or information.
d.  discovering/connecting laws, models, and theories.
e.  discussing the limits of scientific knowledge.
f.  integrating concepts such as change, scale, and consequences.
g.  put science into context in historical, cultural, political, social, and ethical
dimensions.
Using chemical technology:
1.  Understanding atomic structure.
Includes:
a.  discussion of contribution to technology utilized by the non-scientist.
b.  discussion of technology-concept relationship.
c.  investigation/discussion of applications/techniques employed in its
development.
2.  Predicting physical properties of matter based upon the concept of intermolecular forces.
Includes:
a.  investigation/discussion of applications/techniques of common usage.
b.  investigation/discussion of applications/techniques in academic usage.
c.  investigation/discussion of applications/techniques in industrial usage.
3.  Developing a conceptual picture of the Periodic Table of the Elements.
Includes computer-based graphical analysis of elemental characteristics.
4.  Discussing/explaining/identifying patterns of chemical reactivity.
Includes:
a.  analyzing reactions for relationship with concept with equipment of current
usage.
b.  employing reactions for analysis of composition with equipment of current
usage.
c.  synthesizing a target compound with equipment of current usage.
5.  Predicting structure/geometry/polarization/hybridization based upon bonding theories.
Includes computer-based energy minimization molecular modeling.
6.  Apply separation methods to analytical problems both qualitatively and quantitatively.
Includes use of instrumentation and equipment of common usage.
Evaluating societal issues dealing with chemical concepts, applications, and technology:

 
 
1.  Integrating the scientific literature with the knowledge base and learned skill.
Includes report writing modeled after professional society guidelines.
2.  Integrating the scientific method into the students’ “way of knowing.”
Includes:
a.  collection of data or information.
b.  organization of data or information.
c.  classification of data or information.
d.  discovering/connecting laws, models, and theories.
e.  discussing the limits of scientific knowledge.
f.  integrating concepts such as change, scale, and consequences.
g.  put science into context in historical, cultural, political, social, and ethical
dimensions.
Enhancing scientific literacy:
1.  Working with metric system using scientific measurements.
Includes:
a.  knowing common metric prefixes such as mega-, kilo-, deci-, centi-, milli-,
micro-, etc.
b.  expressing measurements and recorded results in correct scientific notation.
c.  knowing basic relationships between SI and English measurement units.
d.  knowing the fundamental measurements with their units.
e.  be able to contrive useful units that are not fundamental such as volume or
molar mass
2.  Writing formulae for compounds based upon their names.
3.  Writing structures for compounds based upon their names.
4.  Deriving names of compounds from structures of inorganic origin.
5.  Deriving names of compounds from a limited selection of compounds of organic origin.
6.  Providing names and symbols for the elements.
7.  Understanding atomic structures.
Includes:
a.  translating/employing from the elemental symbol/name atom
qualities/behavior.
b.  using an element’s atomic mass (atomic weight).
8.  Expressing/interpreting solution concentrations in standard/nonstandard units.
9.  Predicting physical properties of matter based upon the concept of intermolecular forces.
Includes:
a.  categorizing/employing the concepts of ‘pure’ and ‘mixture.’
b.  categorizing/employing the concepts of ‘homogeneous’ and ‘heterogeneous.’
c.  categorizing/employing the concepts of ‘element’ and ‘compound.’
d.  identifying/using physical properties/techniques for separating components of
a mixture.
e.  discussing/defining/using the physical and chemical changes/properties.
10.  Integrating the scientific literature with the knowledge base and learned skills.
Includes writing reports that model professional society guidelines.
11.  Integrating the scientific method into the students’ “way of knowing.”
Includes:
a.  collection of data or information.
b.  organization of data or information.
c.  classification of data or information.
d.  discovering/connecting laws, models, and theories.
e.  discussing the limits of scientific knowledge.
f.  integrating concepts such as change, scale, and consequences.
g.  putting science into context in historical, cultural, political, social, and ethical
dimensions.
12.  Identifying/classifying compounds (such as acids, bases, salts, etc.) by their characteristics.
Developing the philosophy of science as inquiry and as societal problem-solving.
1.  Understanding atomic structure.
Includes:
a.  discussion of the historical context of the development of the atomic theory.
b.  discussion of the scientific method as applied to modeling atomic structure.
c.  investigating/performing techniques employed to develop atomic theory.
2.  Predicting physical properties of matter based upon the concept of intermolecular forces.
Includes:
a.  discussion of extrapolation of student-employed techniques to applications
outside general chemistry laboratory.
b.  application of techniques based upon this concept.
3.  Integrating the scientific literature with knowledge base and learned skills.
Includes report writing that models professional society guidelines.
4.  Integrating the scientific method into the students’ “way of knowing.”
Includes:
a.  collection of data or information.
b.  organization of data or information.
c.  classification of data or information.
d.  discovering/connecting laws, models, and theories.
e.  discussing the limits of scientific knowledge.
f.  integrating concepts such as change, scale, and consequences.
g.  putting science into context in historical, cultural, political, social, and ethical
dimensions.


 


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