Tentative 

CHEMISTRY LABORATORY GENERAL POLICY

All Semesters’CHEM 1361 General Chemistry ISections 3935 and 3940

Dr. BryanSC225E591-8006

Go to Chem 1361 Syllabus


 
Students are responsible for safety and for the stewardship of the laboratory.Students are expected to read the laboratory manual before coming to the lab session and they should be familiar with the techniques and precautions necessary for safe performance of the experiment. During the first laboratory session, you will be afforded the opportunity to choose a laboratory partner and a workstation; please maintain these choices for the duration of the semester so that chemical hygiene responsibilities are consistently distributed. 
There are fifteen laboratory sessions scheduled for this semester.Each student is expected to attend all fifteen laboratory sessions.Any absence that is not documented as excused will result in a score of zero; dropping the single, lowest experiment report grade will be employed to correct an excused absence.Performance of all fifteen lab exercises as indicated by submission of all fifteen experiment reports will result in bonus points.Three absences will result in a failing grade even if documented as excused.
Students are to document all of the required laboratory activities as indicated by the laboratory schedule in a LABORATORY NOTEBOOK.Its submission for grading is strictly due on the Friday before the last scheduled laboratory session [The instructor will attempt to grade the laboratory notebooks weekly during the laboratory session.].The notebook must be permanently bound and it probably should have at least twenty-five pages.Every page should be numbered upon its use; and a table of contents should be constructed.The last page of each lab exercise recorded in the lab notebook should be dated and signed by the student.Each page is to be TITLED with the name of the experiment.Prior to the performance of the lab activity, an ABSTRACT is to be written that describes the purpose, goal, objective, and significance of the experiment.An INTRODUCTION is to be included that supplies a background on the theoretical and experimental models necessary for understanding the lab activity; this can include the instructor’s pre-lab lecture.During the lab exercise, the experimental PROCEDURE is to be documented in a fashion that clearly indicates the methods used and that could be used to repeat the experiment in the absence of the lab textbook.DATA AND INTERPRETATION of data is the most important section; your results are the fruit of your labor.The report sheet from the lab textbook can be employed by taping it onto a permanently bound page in the lab notebook.You lab notebook is your scratchpad for showing all your CALCULATIONS.A CONCLUSION that answers the question asked in the abstract is a requirement.If authored/edited/commercial printed materials are employed for the accomplishment of the lab activity, they must be REFERENCED by author name, title, edition number, publisher, location of publisher, year of publication, and pages used.Your lab team is to be indicated in an ACKNOWLEDGMENT section through your indicating the nature and quality of their assistance.WITNESS signature by the instructor before leaving the lab session dedicated to that lab exercise is the final addition to the entry for each experiment.Each of the boldfaced, capitalized sections will be worth six (6) points for the entry graded.
ASSESSMENT:
Notebook (one experiment will be chosen at random for grading):60 points
Report (due on or before the Friday following lab session dedicated to experiment):10 points each

Safety (comments on accidents/safety incidents missing from Acknowledgment section

in the laboratory notebook will result in the deduction of safety points; violations will

also result in deductions):20 points each

Bonus points are available if you can provide the instructor current, documented, properly referenced descriptions of proper disposal methods [Statements like ‘follow local, state, and federal guidelines’ or lab manual suggestions will not be considered for bonus points.] for materials used/generated in the laboratory exercise.Three (3) percentage points is the maximum that can be accumulated at one point each.

A: 90-100%B: 80-89%C: 70-79%D: 60-69%F: <60%



Chem 1361 Syllabus
 CHEM 1361:GENERAL CHEMISTRY LABORATORY I
THE COURSE DESCRIBED BELOW IS A LABORATORY COURSE WHICH ATTEMPTS TO INTEGRATE LABORATORY METHODOLOGY AND TECHNIQUE WITH CONCEPTUAL ASPECTS OF CHEMISTRY.THIS COURSE AS DESIGNED ASSUMES THAT THE STUDENT HAS BEEN EXPOSED TO CHEMISTRY THROUGH PREREQUISITE OR CONCURRENT ENROLLMENT IN GENERAL CHEMISTRY I (CHEM 1364).
PLEASE CONTACT THE OFFICE OF MULTI-CULTURAL AND DISABLED SERVICES IF YOU FEEL YOU NEED SPECIAL ACCOMMODATIONS.THE SAME ACADEMIC STANDARDS ARE APPLIED TO ALL STUDENTS ENROLLED IN GENERAL CHEMISTRY LABORATORY.
CHEM 1364 is the first semester of a two-semester course in general chemistry.Chemistry is considered a central, core course to the sciences and related disciplines.This course centers on the introduction of laboratory techniques necessary for the analysis and study of matter.Concurrent enrollment should include General Chemistry I (CHEM 1364).Satisfactory credit must be earned in both lecture and the laboratory components before formal credit is granted for either.General Chemistry I (CHEM 1364) and General Chemistry Laboratory I (CHEM 1361) constitute a five-credit hour lecture-laboratory course that satisfies the physical science component for general education and that serves as the beginning course for the major or the minor degree program in chemistry.
Students have the opportunity to gain experience from a number of techniques illustrated in the laboratory exercises.Traditional and common techniques form the central core of activities, but application of computers is frequented in an attempt to enhance the introduction of modern data analysis techniques.A broader view of chemistry is encouraged through invitation of laboratory students to departmental and university seminars and professional meetings.Students have the responsibility to avail themselves of the opportunities to broaden themselves by utilizing available computer technology such as internet access and tutorial software and by employing the traditional office visit.
PROGRAM OBJECTIVES
1.The initial preparation of the chemistry major to directly enter the chemical industry.
2.The initial preparation of the chemistry major to enter graduate programs in chemistry and related sciences.
3.The initial preparation of the student for entry into graduate professional programs such as M.D., D.D.S., D.V.M., and D.O.
4.Discipline support for other degree programs such as agriculture, biology, and technology.

5.A source of general education in the physical sciences.This course should contribute to the
a.ability to place public issues in a scientific context.
b.opportunity to understand the scientific process.
c.recognition of the importance of experimentation used to probe nature.
d. experience of using mathematics to describe nature.
e.exposure to basic universal laws which describe our physical environment.
f.opportunity to develop application of scientific concepts.
g.appreciation for discovery and advances in scientific/technical disciplines.
COURSE OBJECTIVES
1.Developing fundamental chemical concepts.
2.Strengthening skills and techniques utilized in chemical applications.
3.Making connections with other disciplines.
4.Using chemical technology.
5.Evaluating societal issues dealing with chemical concepts, applications, or technology.
6.Enhancing science literacy.
7.Developing the philosophy of science as inquiry and as societal problem-solving.
PERFORMANCE OBJECTIVES
Developing fundamental chemical concepts:
1.Understand atomic structures.
Includes describing the structure of the atom by analysis of elemental line
spectra.
2.Develop a conceptual picture of the Periodic Table of the Elements.
Includes:
a.classification of the elements by their characteristics.
b.explaining/defining the subdivisions in groups of two, six, eight, ten, etc.
c.developing generalizations that can be applied to predicting behavior.
3.Discuss/explain bonding theories.
Includes:
a.predicting the types of bonds present in compounds.
b.predicting the form of compounds in solution based upon types of bonds
present.
4.Predict and quantify the relationship of pressure, volume, mass, and temperature of gases.
Includes characterization of a gas by application of this relationship.
5.Discuss/explain/identify patterns of chemical reactivity.
Includes:
a.analysis and describing of metathesis reactions.
b.utilizing an understanding of acid-base reactions to analyze samples by
titration.

c.utilizing an understanding of combination/decomposition reactions to analyze
samples for empirical formulae.
d.utilizing an understanding of precipitation reactions to analyze samples by
gravimetric methods.
Strengthening skills and techniques utilized in chemical applications:
1.Work with metric system using scientific measurements.
Includes:
a.determining the number of significant figures in a measured quantity.
b.record a numerical result expressing the correct number of significant figures.
c.use unit-factor (or dimensional) analysis for chemical problem solving.
d.perform calculations dealing with units derived from length, mass, and
quantity.
e.perform calculations dealing with contrived units such as density and
concentration.
f.convert between temperature scales.
2.Calculate stoichiometric values involving solids, liquids, gases, or solutions.
Includes:
a.calculating masses.
b.calculating volumes.
c.calculating quantities in moles.
d.calculating concentrations.
e.calculating/using contrived units such as molar mass and molecular weights.
3.Interconvert and apply concentration units.
4.Apply separation methods to analytical problems both qualitatively and quantitatively.
5.Manipulate and interpret laboratory data numerically and graphically.
6.Interpret and predict molecular and atomic behavior as measured by spectrometers both qualitatively and quantitatively.
7.Predict electronic structure based upon elemental position in the Periodic Table.
8.Predict physical and chemical properties of elements based upon position in the Periodic Table.
9.Predict structure, geometry, polarization, and hybridization based upon bonding theories and molecular modeling methods such as energy minimization.
Making connections with other disciplines:
1.Predicting physical properties of matter based upon the concept of intermolecular forces.
Includes:
a.investigation/discussion of applications at home.
b.investigation/discussion of applications in the community.
c.investigation/discussion of applications in other disciplines.

2.Integrating the scientific literature with the knowledge base and learned skills already possessed by the student.
3.Integrating the scientific method into the students’ “way of knowing.”
Includes:
a.collection of data or information.
b.organization of data or information.
c.classification of data or information.
d.discovering/connecting laws, models, and theories.
e.discussing the limits of scientific knowledge.
f.integrating concepts such as change, scale, and consequences.
g.put science into context in historical, cultural, political, social, and ethical
dimensions.
Using chemical technology:
1.Understanding atomic structure.
Includes:
a.discussion of contribution to technology utilized by the non-scientist.
b.discussion of technology-concept relationship.
c.investigation/discussion of applications/techniques employed in its
development.
2.Predicting physical properties of matter based upon the concept of intermolecular forces.
Includes:
a.investigation/discussion of applications/techniques of common usage.
b.investigation/discussion of applications/techniques in academic usage.
c.investigation/discussion of applications/techniques in industrial usage.
3.Developing a conceptual picture of the Periodic Table of the Elements.
Includes computer-based graphical analysis of elemental characteristics.
4.Discussing/explaining/identifying patterns of chemical reactivity.
Includes:
a.analyzing reactions for relationship with concept with equipment of current
usage.
b.employing reactions for analysis of composition with equipment of current
usage.
c.synthesizing a target compound with equipment of current usage.
5.Predicting structure/geometry/polarization/hybridization based upon bonding theories.
Includes computer-based energy minimization molecular modeling.
6.Apply separation methods to analytical problems both qualitatively and quantitatively.
Includes use of instrumentation and equipment of common usage.
Evaluating societal issues dealing with chemical concepts, applications, and technology:

1.Integrating the scientific literature with the knowledge base and learned skill.
Includes report writing modeled after professional society guidelines.
2.Integrating the scientific method into the students’ “way of knowing.”
Includes:
a.collection of data or information.
b.organization of data or information.
c.classification of data or information.
d.discovering/connecting laws, models, and theories.
e.discussing the limits of scientific knowledge.
f.integrating concepts such as change, scale, and consequences.
g.put science into context in historical, cultural, political, social, and ethical
dimensions.
Enhancing scientific literacy:
1.Working with metric system using scientific measurements.
Includes:
a.knowing common metric prefixes such as mega-, kilo-, deci-, centi-, milli-,
micro-, etc.
b.expressing measurements and recorded results in correct scientific notation.
c.knowing basic relationships between SI and English measurement units.
d.knowing the fundamental measurements with their units.
e.be able to contrive useful units that are not fundamental such as volume or
molar mass
2.Writing formulae for compounds based upon their names.
3.Writing structures for compounds based upon their names.
4.Deriving names of compounds from structures of inorganic origin.
5.Deriving names of compounds from a limited selection of compounds of organic origin.
6.Providing names and symbols for the elements.
7.Understanding atomic structures.
Includes:
a.translating/employing from the elemental symbol/name atom
qualities/behavior.
b.using an element’s atomic mass (atomic weight).
8.Expressing/interpreting solution concentrations in standard/nonstandard units.
9.Predicting physical properties of matter based upon the concept of intermolecular forces.
Includes:
a.categorizing/employing the concepts of ‘pure’ and ‘mixture.’
b.categorizing/employing the concepts of ‘homogeneous’ and ‘heterogeneous.’
c.categorizing/employing the concepts of ‘element’ and ‘compound.’
d.identifying/using physical properties/techniques for separating components of
a mixture.
e.discussing/defining/using the physical and chemical changes/properties.

10.Integrating the scientific literature with the knowledge base and learned skills.
Includes writing reports that model professional society guidelines.
11.Integrating the scientific method into the students’ “way of knowing.”
Includes:
a.collection of data or information.
b.organization of data or information.
c.classification of data or information.
d.discovering/connecting laws, models, and theories.
e.discussing the limits of scientific knowledge.
f.integrating concepts such as change, scale, and consequences.
g.putting science into context in historical, cultural, political, social, and ethical
dimensions.
12.Identifying/classifying compounds (such as acids, bases, salts, etc.) by their characteristics.
Developing the philosophy of science as inquiry and as societal problem-solving.
1.Understanding atomic structure.
Includes:
a.discussion of the historical context of the development of the atomic theory.
b.discussion of the scientific method as applied to modeling atomic structure.
c.investigating/performing techniques employed to develop atomic theory.
2.Predicting physical properties of matter based upon the concept of intermolecular forces.
Includes:
a.discussion of extrapolation of student-employed techniques to applications
outside general chemistry laboratory.
b.application of techniques based upon this concept.
3.Integrating the scientific literature with knowledge base and learned skills.
Includes report writing that models professional society guidelines.
4.Integrating the scientific method into the students’ “way of knowing.”
Includes:
a.collection of data or information.
b.organization of data or information.
c.classification of data or information.
d.discovering/connecting laws, models, and theories.
e.discussing the limits of scientific knowledge.
f.integrating concepts such as change, scale, and consequences.
g.putting science into context in historical, cultural, political, social, and ethical
dimensions.
 


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