Public invited to Cameron University’s Computing and Technology Week

The Cameron University Department of Computing and Technology will host Computing and Technology Week from April 11-13 with a series of presentations that will feature a broad range of topics. The presentations are open to the public at no charge. 

A variety of topics will be presented on Wednesday, April 11.  At 10 a.m., Dr. Krishnaiyan Thulasiraman, a professor in the School of Computer Science at the University of Oklahoma, will explore “Discrete Optimization and Network Engineering.” Graph theory and discrete optimization have played a key role in the study of a large number of problems in computer science and engineering.  In recent years, these methodologies have been extensively used in the areas of VLSI circuit/system design and network engineering. This presentation features an overview of three areas in network engineering where graph theory and discrete optimization techniques play a foundational role: QoS routing in communication networks, cross-layer survivability in IP-over WDM optical networks and topology abstraction service for IP VPNs. The presentation will take place in the CETES Conference Center.

At 1 p.m., Dr. Amy C. Bradshaw, Associate Professor of Instructional Psychology & Technology, College of Education, University of Oklahoma, will present Connotations of Color, Line, Direction, and Font Choice in Multimedia & Web-based Applications.” Color choice, dominant expression of line and direction, and choice of font all can convey meaning to users and viewers that may support or contradict a developer’s intended messages in multimedia or web-based applications. Regardless of the specific tools and software programs used, careful attention to implicit connotations of visual design decisions is an important factor in the overall appeal and success of projects. The presentation will take place in the CETES Conference Center.

At 1:45, Dr. Deniz Eseryel, Assistant Professor of Instructional Psychology & Technology, College of Education, University of Oklahoma, will focus on Ensuring Instructional Soundness in Educational Simulations & Games.” Designing effective educational simulations and games is a complex enterprise. This presentation introduces the Interactivity3 Design and Evaluation Framework for educational simulations and games, which was developed as a result of a 4-year design-based research study that investigated effective design principles to promote student motivation and higher-order learning outcomes. The presentation will take place in the CETES Conference Center.

At 2:30, Dr. Deborah Trytten, Associate Professor, School of Computer Science, University of Oklahoma, will present The Educational Content of Computer Game Development.” In order for computer game development to be offered for computer science credit in an ABET-CAC accredited computer science department, the course must provide students with more than just technical training. Game development is the ultimate computer science project, consisting of the creation and implementation of a mathematical model of a real or imagined physical world. It integrates many computer science sub-disciplines including human computer interaction, computer graphics and software engineering and requires experience with many ABET professional outcomes.  This combination makes computer game development useful not only as a computer science class, but even as a capstone project. The presentation will take place in the CETES Conference Center.

At 4 p.m., the action moves to the Buddy Green Room in the McMahon Centennial Complex, where Phil Morris, Managing Director of Global Operations for @Tokyo, a high-end data center colocation company headquartered in Japan, will present via Skype. He will focus on “HPC and Efficiency…Getting the Best Bang for Your Buck.” According to Morris, the Exascale Challenge moves us toward the ability to create a supercomputer that can handle multiple types of problem sets (heavy compute, heavy data, heavy interconnect, etc.). This creates the need for better programming paradigms. This presentation will explore those challenges.

On Thursday, April 12, Tim Marley, IT Audit Manager for the University of Oklahoma, Cameron University and Rogers State University Board of Regents, will present on two topics in the CETES Conference Center. At 10 a.m., he will feature A Day in the Life of a Security Professional,” focusing on day-to-day experiences. He will cover the issues of professionalism, customer service, project management and career growth that a security professional encounters, as well as how security is managed at a large institution.

At 11:30 a.m., Marley will focus on IT Governance, Risk Management and Compliance.” IT Governance, Risk Management and Compliance (IT GRC) have been buzz words in the IT industry for several years.  Marley will address what they really mean, and how they apply to various organizations. Find out if you are adequately addressing risks and managing your IT efforts effectively and efficiently, and how familiar you are with recent data regulations that may impact your organization.  

At 1 p.m., Dr. Qi Cheng, Associate Professor, School of Computer Science, University of Oklahoma, will present “Cryptography: From Art To Science.” From the beginning of recorded history, people have been concerned about communication privacy. Ancient encryption schemes, though cleverly designed, were not resistant to serious attacks. Many modern cryptographical techniques base their security on hard number theoretical problems, thus presenting a greater challenge to cryptanalysis.  Learn about the history of cryptography and its use in securing modern computer systems. This presentation takes place in the Cameron University School of Business Building, Room 111.

Cameron students will demonstrate their knowledge during several computer and technology related competitions starting at 9 a.m. on Friday, April 13. Competitions include Hacking, Multimedia Visual Poster, MS Office, CS Programming, Database and HS Computer Competency Exam. An awards banquet, featuring a keynote by John Eisenmenger, Systems Administrator for Google, will take place at 5 p.m.

Computing and Technology Week is made possible by the Odessa Drinnon Endowed Lectureship in Pre-Engineering Technology and the Ajesh Bhargava Endowed Lectureship in Computing Sciences.

For more information, contact the Cameron University Department of Computing and Technology at 580-581-2335.

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April 5, 2012

PR#12-069